Context from Campus: July 6-10

Trending Topics:

Profanity professor
Recently President Obama did an hour-long interview and mentioned the N-word when discussing race relations. There were many strong reactions to the president using the controversial word, and it stirred many conversations about the use of taboo language. Randall Eggert, assistant professor of linguistics at the U and author of “This Book is Taboo: An Introduction to Linguistics through Swearing,” is available to discuss why words that were once considered obscene have become more acceptable and other words that were once mainstream have become forbidden. Examples of such words are mostly racial and sexual slurs. As our acceptance of four-letter words grows, our acceptance of derogatory terms and slurs decreases. Eggert can also discuss how this changes in each generation, and as some four-letter words become more frequently used, the next generation will find new words to cause offense.
Phone: 801-541-6221 | Email: reggert@hum.utah.edu

It’s hot out there: Are your kids getting enough to drink?
With record-breaking heat on deck for Utah in the coming week, hydration is key. But how do you know if your kids are getting enough water? A new study from Harvard University found that most American kids and teens don’t drink enough water, which is leaving them mildly dehydrated. Mild dehydration can cause health issues such as headaches, irritability, poor physical performance and difficulty learning. How can parents encourage kids’ water intake throughout the day, and is it ok to get fluids from other sources? Scott Youngquist, an emergency physician at University of Utah Health Care, is available to speak on the issue. To schedule an interview, contact Libby Mitchell or Marissa Villaseñor at U Health Sciences Office of Public Affairs.
Libby Mitchell | Phone: 801-587-0945 | Email: libby.mitchell@hsc.utah.edu
Marissa Villase
ñor | Phone: 801-581-3102 | Email: marrisa.villaseñor@hsc.utah.edu

Firework safety for the Fourth of July
Brad Wiggins has worked in the U’s burn unit for nearly 20 years as an RN. He is available to discuss firework safety and burn injuries related to fireworks or campfires. To schedule an interview, contact Libby Mitchell or Marissa Villaseñor at the U Health Sciences Office of Public Affairs.
Libby Mitchell | Phone: 801-587- 0945 | Email: libby.mitchell@hsc.utah.edu
Marissa Villase
ñor | Phone: 801-581-3102 | Email: marrisa.villaseñor@hsc.utah.edu


Event Highlights:

Begins Friday, July 3
Some kids spend their summers at the pool. Others are testing their chops at becoming the next great problem solvers at the U’s Innovation Week at the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute. The camps allow students to practice the skills of identifying problems, proposing and testing solutions and ideas. In the first camp, July 6-9, for ages 15-18, students will visit a research and innovation lab on campus and meet professors and students who will share experiences with them. Openings are still available and students can register through Youth Education at 801-581-6984 or www.youth.utah.edu. The second camp, July 13-16, for ages 13-15, is designed to help younger teens learn how they can take a great idea and turn their vision into reality. Students will work with teams to design and develop a creative new product, and will also practice promoting and pitching their ideas to potential investors. Media should call Thad Kelling 801-631-8078 to arrange interviews, as students will be at different parts of campus throughout the day.
9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Media Contacts For This Story

communications specialist, University Communications, University of Utah
Office Phone: 801-581-7295
Cell Phone: 435-232-0312