st century wishes to free itself from the cycle of violence, acts of terror and war, and avoid repetition of the experience of the 20th century… there is no other way except by understanding and putting into practice every human right for all mankind," remarked Dr. Shirin Ebadi in her 2003 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

" /> st century wishes to free itself from the cycle of violence, acts of terror and war, and avoid repetition of the experience of the 20th century… there is no other way except by understanding and putting into practice every human right for all mankind," remarked Dr. Shirin Ebadi in her 2003 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

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Human Rights: The Struggle for Iran


Apr.9, 2008 – “If the 21st century wishes to free itself from the cycle of violence, acts of terror and war, and avoid repetition of the experience of the 20th century… there is no other way except by understanding and putting into practice every human right for all mankind,” remarked Dr. Shirin Ebadi in her 2003 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

The second annual Tanner Humanities Center’s World Leaders Lecture Forum welcomes Iranian attorney and human rights activist Dr. Shirin Ebadi.  Her talk, “Human Rights: The Struggle in Iran,” will take place on Friday, April 18 from 11 a.m. to noon in the Olpin Union Ballroom on the University of Utah campus. The event is free and open to the public. 

A towering figure with a commanding voice that will not be silenced, Ebadi courageously champions democracy and basic human rights for women, children, and all individuals. Her influence extends far beyond the borders of her county, inspiring hope that Islam, democracy, and human rights co-exist despite the challenges faced in these turbulent times.

She is the first Muslim woman as well as the first Iranian to receive the coveted Nobel Peace Prize.

Ebadi earned her law degree from the University of Tehran, and from 1975-1979 served as president of the city court of Tehran, one of the first female judges in Iran. After the 1979 revolution she was forced to resign, declared by the revolutionaries as unfit to serve. At one time in her struggle, she was marked for death by those who sought to still her voice. Ebadi now works as an attorney defending political dissenters and men, women, and children victimized by the legal system.

Bob Goldberg, professor of history and director of the Tanner Humanities Center, remarked that, “the University of Utah is honored to bring to campus and community so important a human rights activist as Ebadi. She is a role model for anyone who believes in the power of the human spirit to change repressive conditions and better the lives of ordinary men and women.”

For detailed event information contact Melanie Ward at 801-581-3732, or visit http://www.thc.utah.edu/. Interviews with Bob Goldberg can be arranged through the Tanner Center.